Parents

The value of a Mizzou education

Since 1839, the University of Missouri has made it possible for students from all walks of life, in Missouri and beyond, to reap the benefits of higher education at a major land-grant university. Considered one of the nation's top-tier institutions, Mizzou has a reputation of excellence in teaching and research and is the flagship campus of the four-campus University of Missouri System. Mizzou attracts more valedictorians, Curators Scholars and Bright Flight Scholars than any other college or university in Missouri. Nearly one-third of freshmen come from the top 10 percent of their high school classes.

According to Kiplinger.comexternal link, Mizzou offers one of the best values in American public education, thanks to affordable tuition and the generosity of donors. In 2012-2013, MU undergraduate students received more than $65,000,000 in scholarship aid, both internal and external.

Info for parents

Who is considered a Parent on the FAFSA (for dependent students)?

Federal Student Aid programs, by law, are based on the assumption that a dependent student and his/her parents have the primary responsibility to pay for college. The law provides several criteria that determine if a student is considered independent of his/her parents for aid eligibility purposes.  See our frequently asked questions for more information on independent status. Note: a student reaching the age of 18 or 21 and/or living apart from his/her parents does not affect his/her dependency status.

A student is instructed to file the FAFSA with his/her legal parents (biological and/or adoptive parent(s). Grandparents, foster parents, legal guardians, older brothers or sisters, and aunts and uncles are not considered parents unless they have legally adopted the student. If legal parents of the student (i.e. biological and/or adoptive) are married to each other, regardless of sexual orientation, or are not married to each other and live together, the student will answer the questions about both of them.

Additional guidance with examples regarding parental information on the FAFSA:

Legal Parents’ Marital Status As of the Date the FAFSA was Filed

Provide information for:

Married or Remarried (to each other)

Both biological/adoptive parents. Consistent with the Supreme Court decision holding Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) unconstitutional, same-sex couples must report their marital status as married if they were legally married in a state or other jurisdiction (foreign country) that permits same-sex marriage, without regard to where the couple resides.

Never Married (and not living with the other biological/adoptive parent)

The biological/adoptive parent with whom the student lived with more during the past 12 months. If the student did not live with one parent any more than the other, provided parental information for the parent   who provided more support during the past 12 months or during the most recent year the student received support from a parent.

Unmarried, living together (with the other biological/adoptive parent)

Both biological/adoptive parents, regardless of gender. Do not include someone who is not married to your parent and who is not a biological/adoptive parent.

Widowed (and not living with the other biological/adoptive parent)

Your biological/adoptive parent.

Widowed and Remarried

The biological/adoptive parent and his/her spouse (as the stepparent).

Divorced or Separated (and not living with the other biological/adoptive parent)

The biological/adoptive parent with whom the student lived with more during the past 12 months. If the student did not live with one parent any more than the other, provided parental information for the parent   who provided more support during the past 12 months or during the most recent year the student received support from a parent.

Remarried, after Divorce

The biological/adoptive parent with whom the student lived with more during the past 12 months and his/her spouse (as the stepparent). If the student did not live with one parent any more than the other, provided parental information for the parent who provided more support during the past 12 months or during the most recent year the student received support from a parent.  

Divorced, but living with the other biological/adoptive parent

Both biological/adoptive parents, regardless of gender. Do not include someone who is not married to your parent and who is not a biological/adoptive parent   (select the marital status of ‘Unmarried, living together’ on the FAFSA).

Separated, but living with the other biological/adoptive parent.

Both biological/adoptive parents, regardless of gender. Do not include someone who is not married to your parent and who is not a biological/adoptive parent   (select the marital status of ‘Married or Remarried’ on the FAFSA).

 Additional Notes:

  • If your biological/adoptive parent lives with someone, but is not legally married, including common-law marriage, and that person is not a biological/adoptive parent, only the biological/adoptive parent provides information on the FAFSA.
  • If your biological/adoptive parent is legally married, including common-law marriage (if recognized in their state of legal residence), provide information for both the biological/adoptive parent and the other parent (as stepparent) on the FAFSA.

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